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There is an interesting article in the NY Times today, discussing storage of digital movies. The article points out the growing problems associated with the changes in technology and the types of storage, all of which are more expensive and less reliable than storing good old film.

So, when we go back to check out old DVD's stored in criminal investigations, will we be able to view them? Video is looking good in hindsight.
 
Posts: 7860 | Location: Georgetown, Texas | Registered: January 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Not a bad idea in cases where important recorded video evidence exists and either capital or long sentences result. It would not be a bad idea in any felony case to just download all digital video evidence onto a vcr tape as a master to be kept with the da's file.

I couldn't see a clerk wanting to take the time to do it in most cases but it certainly would be a good idea for the State to do so in capital cases, don't you think?

During trial, file with the clerk a sealed package (not in evidence for the jury but for the record) containing a cumulative video of all the digital evidence in the case and file a motion correlating the video contents with the exhibits admitted at trial to the jury.

I've got an upcoming lecture on evidence retention for the District Clerks Asso, and I will certainly credit you for that idea.

As we all know, digital information in any format can sometimes inexlicably just go "poof" and disappear. Never to return. It could happen where a dvd of crucial evidence blanks out in all copies for unforeseeable reasons.
 
Posts: 2577 | Location: The Great State of Texas | Registered: December 26, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The presupposes that VCR's will exist in 20 more years. It's getting complicated.
 
Posts: 7860 | Location: Georgetown, Texas | Registered: January 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think a magnetic format would have more chance of being retrieveable than a format where the information just went away.
 
Posts: 2577 | Location: The Great State of Texas | Registered: December 26, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My 9-year-old stepson was astonished that we didn't have DVD players when we were growing up. My husband said, "Yeah, we didn't even have VCR's," to which my stepson responded "what's a VCR?" OUCH!!!!

At least he got to hear my mother's original 45 of Alvin and the Chipmunks. Perhaps we should put audio back on vinyl.
 
Posts: 1089 | Location: UNT Dallas | Registered: June 29, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It is of interest that several groups are attempting to address the issue of long term digital archiving. Evidently there is some movement in the direction of adopting a single uniform standard for archiving. No one knows whether it will pan out... check out http://www.pdfa.org/doku.php
 
Posts: 17 | Location: Rio Grande City, TX, U.S. | Registered: November 08, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
<Note>
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(This 4,000+ word rant has been removed by the Administrator due to inappropriate content.)
[This message was edited by Shannon Edmonds on 12-31-07 at .]

[This message was edited by Shannon Edmonds on 12-31-07 at .]
 
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I got really lost in the above post, somewhere after the second or third run on sentence. I tried to follow, but it was folly to do so.

Notwithstanding the commentary above, I still think, for the foreseeable future, that backing up important digital evidence with magnetic tape media is the way to go.
 
Posts: 2577 | Location: The Great State of Texas | Registered: December 26, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Greg, I took the time to skim this posting and all I got out of it was Harry Potter uses GHB on girls. OK. To that poster I can only say the topic was on 1) Digital Storage, and 2) seek some help in your local jurisdiction.

Happy New Year!
 
Posts: 293 | Location: San Antonio | Registered: January 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm into photography where reliable storage is a much-discussed issue in today's digital world. While not everything photogs do may be practical for evidence storage, here's the short version:

I keep a copy of all images on an external hard drive which is kept unplugged and disconnected from the computer except during storage sessions to protect against accidents, voltages surges, lightning, etc. Prices keep falling on these and you can probably get a career's worth of typical images on a $150 drive today.

Another two copies are kept on disc, each copy being kept in a separate location in case of fire, etc. Unlike the commercial versions, both CD and DVD discs for home recording use a dye-based system and that dye is subject to breakdown over time. Keep them in a cool, dry, dark place for best life. DVDs hold more, but their life expectancy is shorter than CD discs. The best are the expensive gold discs - usually not available at your local Wally World.

Reliable disc life (home discs) is estimated at between 2 and 10 years, depending on all the variables and which lab report you read. I've had cheap discs get corrupted in less than 3. A typical computer will often fail to read an image that is still 99% intact. Retrieval software is available at a wide price range and can save an image like that. The one from SanDisk has worked well for me (comes free with some of their products like the Extreme line of flash memory cards).
 
Posts: 137 | Location: Corsicana, TX | Registered: May 10, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by SAProsecutor:
Greg, I took the time to skim this posting and all I got out of it was Harry Potter uses GHB on girls. OK. To that poster I can only say the topic was on 1) Digital Storage, and 2) seek some help in your local jurisdiction.

Happy New Year!


Same to you, friend!

Mr/Ms. Note gets sort of Kerouac-ian as it progresses but I take it that he or she is not happy with the handling of some form of legal matter.

I would note the following note, for Mr/Ms. Note:

Welcome to the TDCAA Bulletin Boards. The discussions in these user forums are for the benefit of prosecutors and their staff members, although we welcome relevant and appropriate input from other members of the criminal justice and government lawyer community. These forums are NOT a source of legal advice for citizens. Call the State Bar of Texas (1-800-204-2222) for information on seeking legal advice.


I more or less began skimming as he began his hypothetical,
YET,
I have several favorite quotes from that manuscript, such as:

"And I'll explain why. but, I am not a DA or considered to be connected to the legal profession or judicial or law enforcement, nor do I want to. I would rather sand paper [on] an already delicate area of my flesh and pour salt on it, for days on end, before connecting myself to your area of expertise. Don't take that wrong, it's from a lack of fully understanding what drives whatever you do, and why. I might not want to know."

"I have very often read on this very site what you sometimes will describe as someone you may not have the goods on over here on this event, and what you do have him on may do this or something else, and you're not risking it, so you take what you can get. That, to me, I am neurotic like there is no other, you are either all a much better person with potentially no sleep at all than I am, or something."
 
Posts: 2577 | Location: The Great State of Texas | Registered: December 26, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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