TDCAA    TDCAA Community  Hop To Forum Categories  Criminal    Jody Arias Mistrial
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Jody Arias Mistrial Login/Join 
Member
posted
Jody Arias Arizona Capital Murder Trial.

FIVE whole months of a sensational on-tv-everyday trial. Mistrial on punishment within 13 hours (over 3 days) because they are deadlocked.

First of all, what kind of trial last for five months? What kind of judge declares a mistrial on a five month trial in only 13 hours???

Arizona is CRAZY!
 
Posts: 293 | Location: San Antonio | Registered: January 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I did hear that they would only have to have a retrial on punishment (like Texas). Still, I know that much of the evidence will have to be repeated, because who actually watches In Session anyway?
 
Posts: 1089 | Location: UNT Dallas | Registered: June 29, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Maybe the judge was tired of all the drama, and wanted to get home for the Memorial Day weekend--did you ever think of that?
 
Posts: 686 | Location: Beeville, Texas, U.S.A. | Registered: March 22, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
What little I saw and followed looked like it was a therapy session for Arias, an absolute smear of the victim on irrelevant matters, and quack defense experts. Kind of like California, just let every bit of stuff in, damn the cost. Big defense win in the mistrial. Hopefully, the judge will get some sense back and limit the smear campaign with the new jury.
 
Posts: 218 | Location: The Border | Registered: April 08, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Being from Phoenix I have been following the case very closely. What I found most funny / disheartening is that even with the 8 - 4 verdict for death, and even after spending $2 million plus on the defense alone, the County Attny there said that money doesn't matter or play apart of the decision as to whether to try again for death.

That seems extremely irresponsible, in my opinion, as a taxpayer. A lot of potholes could be filled with $2 million, same with teachers for schools. Plus, it would be 15 or 20 years till any potential execution date (assuming the State is willing to execute a woman).
 
Posts: 36 | Location: UT - Austin Law School | Registered: January 10, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I double dog dare you to look a victim's family in the eye and tell them that in that way. While cost is relevant, there are MANY factors that go into a decision to pursue the death penalty.
 
Posts: 1089 | Location: UNT Dallas | Registered: June 29, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Agree with Gretchen. My heart goes out to the victim's family. I hate they have to go through even part of this again.
 
Posts: 2577 | Location: The Great State of Texas | Registered: December 26, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
That seems extremely irresponsible, in my opinion, as a taxpayer. A lot of potholes could be filled with $2 million, same with teachers for schools. Plus, it would be 15 or 20 years till any potential execution date (assuming the State is willing to execute a woman).


Let's economize where we can, but we already don't spend enough on the criminal justice system. Miss Arias is the embodiment of why we would put a woman to death. Evil.

In many ways the system needs to be streamlined, and it can be, if we get off of this kick that, somehow, the criminal justice system can solve all the ills of society, or that the system should be a "social work program" for sociopaths who just need to be removed from polite society.

I will avoid the rest of the scree. How unusual for me.
 
Posts: 218 | Location: The Border | Registered: April 08, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
The thing is, though, she isn't going to be put to death. Even if she is eventually sentenced to death, she wouldn't be executed for decades (if that).

Only 34 people have been executed in AZ since 1976, and none of them female.

So we spend millions of extra dollars for what?
 
Posts: 36 | Location: UT - Austin Law School | Registered: January 10, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Justice
 
Posts: 218 | Location: The Border | Registered: April 08, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by MDK27:
Justice


Nice.

We should always strive to see that justice is done. Molly-- If Arias (pure evil) doesn't deserve death, then who does?
 
Posts: 293 | Location: San Antonio | Registered: January 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Everybody wants "justice" (whatever that is). But justice, like everything else, comes at a price.

This case already has cost the tax payers over $1.7 million just on defense costs alone. Throw in costs for prosecution, police, and courts, and I'll bet that number gets pretty close to $3 million. And for what? A big, fat nothing, that's what!

She was already going to be found guilty of murder no matter what. The only argument was what kind of murder it would be. The kind that you get life (or life w/o parole) for or the kind that you get death for. She offered to plea before but was turned down.

So now the punishment phase has to be done all over again. And how much more is that going to cost?

Then there will be the appeals. Since her case has gone on so long and because of the issues with the jury verdict and retrial, there will be a TON of appellate issues that will take years and years and years to resolve.

So how much "justice" is enough and how much are we as a society willing to pay for it? Every dollar used on her case is a dollar that is not available for use elsewhere. So what is wrong with being a good steward of the tax payer's dollars while also seeking "justice" for the community. They are not mutually exclusive, in my opinion.

If they had allowed her to plea out she would already be in prison by now and the case over with. Remember: Arizona has NEVER executed a woman. Not once. So working hard and spending all this money to give her a punishment (and "justice") that she is never going to face seems pointless.
 
Posts: 36 | Location: UT - Austin Law School | Registered: January 10, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Again, sometimes justice means looking a victim's family in the eye and telling them that their loved one's life mattered MORE THAN MONEY and that you did everything in your power to get the punishment you and they think that the offender deserves.

When you run for office, you can run on your anti-death penalty platform and if people elect you, then more power to you to make the changes you want to see made. But as long as states still have a death penalty available (regardless of how long it takes and how much it costs to implement) then prosecutors are within their rights to seek it.

FYI, kind of on the topic of lives and money - if anyone likes mystery novels, read "The Value of Life" by Andy Crowson. Great read!
 
Posts: 1089 | Location: UNT Dallas | Registered: June 29, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I am not anti-death penalty. I've no problem with someone being executed if they did something really, really bad - far more bad then the "average" murder.

I just think that one should be detached and not emotionally involved when it comes to prosecutions (or even defense). While you mention about looking the victim's family in the eye, etc., what about looking the tax payers in the eye, too? $3 million could have been spent filling pot holes or how many head start teachers or how about healthcare for the poor or jobs programs for minority youths or a diversion program for youthful offenders?

Don't all of those other people count, too?

And its not like Jodi would be getting off or going free. Life in prison w/o parole is pretty damn harsh. She is only like 32. So its 40 or 50 years in prison with no chance for release.

She only killed one person in what basically amounted to a typical domestic violence-type situation. Yes, she is evil and a very bad person and she does deserve to be punished. And she will be punished.

A plea would have only cost what, $10 thousand or thereabouts (I've no clue and am just guessing). So you have that very small amount of money - with the certainty and finality of a very harsh punishment, compared with a HUGE expense and great uncertainty of a possible death penalty.

The fact that you have a DA running around giving out autographs and high-fiving the crowd only makes me think even more that this is more about headlines and not "justice". If he had just done the plea three years ago would this case have garnered worldwide attention and his name all over the news?
 
Posts: 36 | Location: UT - Austin Law School | Registered: January 10, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Molly:
I am not anti-death penalty.


All evidence to the contrary.
 
Posts: 293 | Location: San Antonio | Registered: January 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Could we talk about the new discovery statute? Where's Terry?
 
Posts: 1243 | Location: houston, texas, u.s.a. | Registered: October 19, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

TDCAA    TDCAA Community  Hop To Forum Categories  Criminal    Jody Arias Mistrial

© TDCAA, 2001. All Rights Reserved.